NIHL Header

Health in Buildings RoundtableImproving Lives with Health-centered Buildings

2018 HiBR Conference

Health in Buildings for Today and Tomorrow: Making Connections

About the Conference

Green buildings are among the fastest growing industries in the world, representing a $260 billion market in the United States in 2015. But while sustainable buildings comprises 20 percent of new construction, these practices lack adoption in certain markets and face the challenge of including best practices in healthy building design. Attendees in the 2018 Health in Buildings Roundtable Conference will engage across sectors and disciplines to develop actionable strategies that incorporate innovative efficiency and design techniques, new building materials, healthy building design, and sustainability standards across multiple building types. 

 

Scholars Program - The Health in Building Roundtable is introducing the 2018 Scholars Program. Information for this exciting new program can be found here. We also give a huge thank you to Linda Sorrento and Patrick Phelan for designing and organizing the Health in Buildings Roundtable Scholars Pilot Program; the first of its kind for the HiBR program. Additional questions about the Scholars Program? Please browse our FAQs here.


 

More than a decade ago, neuroscience leaders at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) foresaw the need to catalyze collaboration across the many diverse subfields of brain research. Their vision gave rise to the concept of a new type of research facility, one that would unite neuroscience research across the NIH. Every aspect of this 500,000 square foot, state-of-the-art complex speaks to the ingenuity and wisdom of its distinguished namesake — from the interactive labs and shared resource spaces to the innovative features that make it one of the world’s most energy-efficient life science facilities. Read more...

Join Architect Jeff Welter and former Project Officer on the Project (retired) Frank Kutlak, along with 2018 Health in Buildings Conference attendees, for an inside tour of this inspiring, healthy and high-performing building.

REGISTER FOR TOUR HERE


It takes many people to organize and manage the conferencing process in order to make it a success. The credit starts with the planning committee and the excellent work and hours that they dedicate on a volunteer basis to ensure the event runs smoothly. We would like to thank the following people for being totally engaged in the 2018 Health in Buildings for Today and Tomorrow: Making Connections Conference. 
 
Conference Planning Team:
Fernando Arias, Clark Construction Group
Michelle L. Coley, National Institutes of Health
Judith Heerwagen, General Services Administration
Susan Permut, National Institutes of Health
Patrick Phelan, Arizona State University
Linda Sorrento, Principal Sustainable Practice
Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Margalit "Margo" Younger, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 
Conference Plenary Session Moderators and Track Co-chairs:
John Balbus, National Institutes of Health
Jonathan Cohen, United States Department of Energy
Cece Doucette,  Wireless Education
Brian Gilligan, General Services Administration
Ming Hu, University of Maryland
Joel Kimmons, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Joyce Lee, IndigoJLD Green Health and Urban Health Lab
Angela Loder, International WELL Building Institute
Kelly Worden, United States Green Building Council
Liz York, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 

Please Note: Conference schedule and details subject to change at any time.
Sign Language Interpreters will be provided.  Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations to participate in this program should contact us at HIBR1@mail.nih.gov or 301-451-6462 and ask for Michelle Coley at least five business days before the conference.
Hotels in the surrounding Bethesda, Maryland area can be found here
Click here to get information regarding NIH campus access and security.  
 

Conference Video

2018 HiBR Conference Opening Remarks - Videos and Playlist

Description: 

Click the red "play" button to watch the first video of the conference series. The entire playlist of videos can be accessed at the end of this video, or at any time by clicking the YouTube logo.

Air Date: 
Sunday, August 19, 2018

Schedule

Thursday - July 19, 2018
07:45 AM to 08:30 AM
Check-in & Registration
Room: 
Natcher
08:30 AM to 08:45 AM
Conference Opening & Welcome Remarks
Room: 
Auditorium

Speakers

Michelle Coley

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Management Analyst, Division of Environmental Protection

Michelle L. Coley is a highly motivated management analyst and Contracting Officer Representative (COR) for the Division of Environmental Protection (DEP) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

She formerly managed the Federal Environmental Symposium on the campus of the NIH at the Natcher Conference Center from 2002 – 2006 saving the government approximately $45K in conference planning costs.  She is currently managing the Health in Buildings Roundtable Program for the NIH/DEP along with negotiating the development of the very first Health in Buildings Roundtable website for HHS/NIH.  She has been identified as the customer service advocate and analyst for the NIH/DEP Decommissioning Team. 

Michelle is a key member of the NIH/DEP management team which depends on her to develop administrative strategies, processes, procedures and recommendations that allow the leadership team to exercise critical judgements as it relates to the environmental review process, customer service and communication solutions for division staff.  She is responsible for overseeing customer relations and developing outreach strategies to ensure that services are satisfactory and consistent with operational needs. 

Michelle’s keen understanding of group coordination, problem solving and integration of work processes facilitate team success. 

Michelle graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a Master’s degree in Human Resource Management/Organizational Development. 

08:45 AM to 09:05 AM
Keynote: Dr. Michael M. Gottesman
Room: 
Auditorium

Speakers

Michael Gottesman

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Deputy Director for Intramural Research

Dr. Michael Gottesman has been Deputy Director for Intramural Research at NIH since 1993. A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, Dr. Gottesman completed an internship and residency at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. He was a research associate at NIH from 1971 to 1974. He returned to Harvard Medical School as an assistant professor before returning to NIH in 1976. Dr. Gottesman became Chief of the Laboratory of Cell Biology in the National Cancer Institute in 1990. From 1992 to 1993, he was Acting Director of the National Center for Human Genome Research, and he was Acting Scientific Director of the NCHGR in 1993. During his 26 years of service in the U.S. Public Health Service as a Commissioned Officer, he achieved the rank of two-star rear admiral as assistant surgeon general.

His research interests have ranged from how DNA is replicated in bacteria to how cancer cells elude chemotherapy. He has published extensively on these subjects, with over 500 scientific publications to his credit. During the past thirty years, he has helped to identify and characterize the human gene that causes cancer cells to resist many anticancer drugs. He has shown that this gene encodes a protein that pumps anticancer drugs out of drug-resistant human cancers and has used this information to create gene transfer vectors, to study the pharmacology of many drugs, and to circumvent drug resistance in cancer. He is an elected fellow of the AAAS and the American Association of Physicians, and has been an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine since 2003 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2008. His scientific work has been recognized by highly competitive awards such as the AACR Rosenthal Foundation Award, the Milken Family Medical Foundation Cancer Research Award, the ASPET award, the ASBMB Bert and Natalie Vallee Award, and the DHHS Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service, among others.

Dr. Gottesman has been actively involved in initiating several training and mentoring programs for high school students and teachers, as well as college, medical and graduate students. As Deputy Director for Intramural Research at NIH, he has initiated an NIH-wide lecture series, and reformulated tenure and review processes in the intramural program. He has also instituted training programs for under-represented minority and disadvantaged students, programs to advance the careers of women scientists, loan repayment programs for clinical researchers at NIH, and a clinical research training program for medical students and early career clinical investigators.

09:05 AM to 09:20 AM
HiBR Scholars Program Announcement: Dr. Antwi Akom, Ph.D, Professor & Founding Director UCSF & SFSU Social Innovation and Urban Opportunity Lab (SOUL), Co-Founder & CEO of Streetwyze
Room: 
Auditorium
The Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) Scholars Program at the National Institutes of Health has been created to help bring together a more diverse group of emerging academics and practitioners in STEM to advance our next generation of interdisciplinary and paradigm-shifting researchers in the areas of science, engineering, and human-centered healthy, sustainable buildings.

The Scholars Program strives to support future generations of underrepresented researchers by recognizing each scholar’s accomplishments and potential, while ensuring equal access to HiBR’s resources, network and community. The Program places continued emphasis on connecting scholars to each other, to mentors and to potential career development resources.  Travel support for Scholars to the 2018 conference is made possible through the generous support of the National Science Foundation Environmental Sustainability Program

Speakers

Antwi Akom

San Francisco State University
Director of the Social Innovation and Urban Opportunity Lab

Dr. Antwi Akom is a Professor of African American Studies and Founding Director of the Social Innovation and Urban Opportunity Lab (SOUL)—the first joint research lab between the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical School and San Francisco State University (SFSU).  Dr. Akom is a nationally recognized research scientist who in 2015 was named by the Obama Administrations Department of Science and Technology as a Presidential innovation fellow for his work with the Opportunity Project, and in 2016 Dr. Akom was named by President Obama as one of the top innovators in the world at the first annual Frontiers conference held at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh PA.  

Currently Dr. Akom is a core investigator on a $17M NIH grant aimed at creating then next generation of biomedical researchers from low-income communities and communities of color.  He is also Co-PI on a $1M NIH Big Data grant aimed at enabling full representation in biomedical Big Data science, participatory technologies, and community generated data, as well as a Co-PI on a multi-million dollar Comprehensive Center of Excellence P60 sub grant with Pam Ling (PI is Dr. Kirsten Bibbin’s Domingo).  In addition to his NIH and NSF research grants, Dr. Akom has raised over $10M dollars in philanthropic grants related to healthy buildings, health\y housing, and real time data on the social, environmental, and biological determinants of health.  

Dr. Akom’s passion is working with students and helping to mentor and develop the next generation of research scientists. Towards this end, Dr. Akom has over a decade of experience as a mentor for over 20 postdoctoral fellows, 40 predoctoral students, and 10 1st generation junior faculty, in a wide variety of disciplines including social/behavioral science, health communications, data visualization, mobile technologies, social media, urban planning, health equity, community-driven data, Big Data, participatory technologies, health informatics,  bioinformatics, environmental and medical sociology.  

Dr. Akom’s believes strongly in the power of collaboration and the importance of daily micro-affirmations for students, staff, and faculty if we are serious about equity and increasing the retention and retainment of URM in the biomedical science and beyond.  More specifically, after he saw the movie Black Panther in early 2018, Dr. Akom now likes to call himself one of many real world "Black Panthers," and his research center a real world "Wakanda” because of the labs emphasis on the power of science and technology to transform access to institutional resources and privileges for URMs.  As evidence, Dr. Akom points to his faculty affiliation with the Center for Vulnerable Population located at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, where his research focuses on collaborative, community-facing technology projects, designing for the public good, human center design, and developing new models of urban innovation in the 21st century that make cities smarter, more equitable, just and sustainable.  Prior to joining UCSF/CVP in 2016, Dr. Akom Co-founded and launched a series of technology startups in the San Francisco Bay area, including Streetwyze, which has been recognized and/or collaborated with Google, Aclima, Sidewalk labs, The Obama administration, Race Forward, PolicyLink, EcoDistricts, Mithun, Perkins + Will, USGBC, and Enterprise Community partners, and the Rockefeller Foundations 100 Resilient Cities to name a few.  Dr. Akom’s work has also been featured in award winning publications such as: the Atlantic's City lab, The Root, Tech Republic, Green Biz, Tech Crunch, and was recently named by PolicyLink as one of the top new health equity tools and mobile platforms designed to build power and self-determination with vulnerable populations http://nationalequityatlas.org/sites/default/files/10-Design-Principles-For-Online-Data-Tools.pdf.  His most recent TEDx Talk is called Innovation Out of Poverty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvrLFgikLZQ.   He holds a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley, M.A. from Stanford University, and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.  

09:20 AM to 10:20 AM
Main Plenary: "Innovating Health in Buildings Implementations"
Room: 
Auditorium

Health in buildings has been an aspiration for decades. Early success helps create more research questions and ultimately metrics that are relevant to a larger group of practitioners. The mainstreaming of sustainability provides a pivotal moment to create this health and wellness focus. In the leadership J-curve model, under what “leaders do”: set directions, build teams, create process, steward structure, and nurture behaviors. When “leaders lead”: they provide support, boundary, space to deliver.  Most important of all, they engage in conversations.

 This conversation will focus on leadership efforts taken from research to implementation. Joyce Lee will engage Fernando Arias, Heather Henriksen, and Richard Piacentini to discuss lessons learned from early adopters and their insights on materials, thermal comfort, lighting, nourishments, and community health.

Speakers

Joyce Lee

IndigoJLD Green Health and Urban Health Lab
President

Joyce Lee, FAIA, LEED Fellow, is President of IndigoJLD providing green health, design, benchmarking and planning services for exemplary projects and communities. She is among a group of 350 LEED Fellows worldwide. Joyce is also on faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and directs building healthy places at the Urban Health Lab.

She has been an Architect Fellow at the National Leadership Academy for Public Health and one of the first LEED accredited professionals in New York City. Joyce served under Mayors Giuliani and Bloomberg. She was the Chief Architect at the New York City OMB overseeing the survey of major city-owned buildings (over 200 million sqft) and waterfronts with the goals of enhancing long-term planning and identifying green design and development opportunities. During her tenure, the program grew over 25%. She was then the first Active Design Director, with a focus on design excellence and human health, in New York City. The Active Design Guidelines, a publication she co-authored, had won recognition from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as well as the Sustainable Building Industry Council. 

Joyce is the recipient of numerous awards including the Health and Human Services Good Neighbor Award, Platinum Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies, the President's Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) New York State, and the Aga Khan Award from Harvard/MIT.

Fernando Arias, Director of Sustainability, Clark Construction Group

Fernando Arias

Clark Construction Group, LLC
Director of Sustainability

Fernando Arias is a former architect and military technician who became passionate about high quality of life early in his career. As Clark Construction Group’s Director of Sustainability, he works with executive leadership to shape Clark’s national sustainability strategy. His passion for green partnerships, plus his many years of experience and expertise in building design and construction, enhances Clark’s sustainability efforts across the country through expanded services, including holistic and advanced approaches to sustainable buildings and infrastructure.

Most recently, Fernando consulted government, non-profit and private sector clients focused on healthy design strategies through outreach on sustainable, healthy community planning via the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) at the National Institutes of Health. He also directed strategic projects and partnerships at the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for multi-million dollar initiatives that drive industry coalitions around age-friendly buildings, and health + wellness engagement.

Prior to joining ASID, Fernando managed strategic relationships at the Clinton Global Initiative, served in both the United States Navy and the Army, practiced architecture for 7 years in New York City and Los Angeles, consulted for Accenture’s Resources Group, and worked for the New York City Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning & Sustainability. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and holds two Masters Degrees from Columbia University in Architecture & Urban Design and in Public Administration focused on Environmental Science and Policy.

Heather Henriksen

Harvard University
Managing Director, Office for Sustainability

Heather Henriksen has served as Harvard University’s chief sustainability officer since 2008, advising the President and senior leadership on strategy and building an organizational change initiative that resulted in the University community achieving its initial science-based climate goal of a 30% reduction in net greenhouse gas emissions, from 2006 to 2016, despite the addition of over 3 million square feet of space. Heather directs the Office for Sustainability which oversees the implementation of the Harvard’s comprehensive Sustainability Plan (co-created with faculty and students in 2014) and the University’s ambitious new Climate Action Plan, announced by President Drew Faust, which sets bold targets to transform campus operations to be fossil fuel-free by 2050 and fossil fuel-neutral by 2026. She and her team have expanded a multi-disciplinary living laboratory research program that partners with faculty and students to use the campus as a test bed for piloting and sharing innovative solutions to real-world sustainability challenges. A nationally recognized leader in healthier building materials, Heather is leading an effort within Harvard and externally with business and non-profit leaders, including Google and Healthy Building Network, to address the use of chemicals of concern in common building materials and products, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Health Product Declaration Collaborative.  She also advises courses throughout Harvard College and the professional graduate schools, and speaks nationally and internationally on sustainability.

Heather serves as Advisory Committee co-chair of the International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) and is a member of the Sustainability Working Group for the Council of Ivy Presidents. In coordination with Harvard’s Executive Vice President, she manages the Higher Education Working Group of the Boston Green Ribbon Commission and serves on the City of Cambridge’s Compact for a Sustainable Future Steering Committee and served on Cambridge’s Net Zero Task Force. Heather is also a member of Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2), and serves on the Board of Trustees of Phillips Brooks House Association. She holds a Master in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School.

Richard Piacentini

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens
Executive Director

Richard V. Piacentini is executive director of Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Since 1994 he has guided the Pittsburgh organization from public to private management and is responsible for the green transformation of its facilities and operations, including: the opening of the first LEED® certified visitor’s center in a public garden; the first LEED® certified greenhouse (LEED® Platinum EBOM); the Tropical Forest Conservatory, one of the most energy-efficient conservatories in the world; and the Center for Sustainable Landscapes, a net-zero energy and water building and the only building to meet the Living Building Challenge®, LEED® Platinum, 4 Stars Sustainable SITESTM and Platinum WELL® Building certifications.

The sustainability efforts Piacentini initiated at Phipps are based on recognizing the vital connections between people, plants, health and the planet. This systems-based way of thinking influences the organization’s actions and programs, particularly those focused on awakening children to nature, and promoting human and environmental well-being. Piacentini serves on the board of the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) as past chair and secretary and on the Mission and Community Needs Committee for Magee-Womens Hospital. He is a member of the Biophilic Design Initiative Advisory Committee and the Advisory Committee for the Biophilic Cities Network. He is a Past President and Treasurer of the American Public Gardens Association (APGA), and has received ILFI, USGBC, and APGA leadership awards. Piacentini holds a MS degree in Botany, an MBA and a BS degree in Pharmacy. He is a Registered Pharmacist and a WELL® Accredited Professional.

10:20 AM to 10:30 AM
Break
10:30 AM to 11:50 AM
Track Discussions: "Research to Practice to Improve Health in Building Policies”
Room: 
Auditorium

Scientific evidence supporting healthy practices in the built environment is robust enough that wide spread application can benefit public health.  However, effective translation of research into building practice and policy requires active collaboration and buy in from a diverse range of experts and stakeholders focusing on basic research, design, architecture, management, worksite wellness, public health, policy making, and more.  This process does not work without guidance and feedback to determine what the problems are, what is needed to resolve them, and how solutions can become standard practice. 

In this session, CDC/NIOSH’s Casey Chosewood and GSA’s Kevin Kampschroer will engage experts Andrew Dannenberg, Joanna Frank, and Esther Sternberg in a discussion exploring what drives health research, how it is translated into practice, and how practice becomes policy. 

Range of topics will include what it means to be a human in the built environment, translation of science to practice and policy, and building certification as incentive to make buildings healthier.

Speakers

Kevin Kampschroer

U.S. General Service Administration (GSA)
Chief Sustainability Officer, and Director, Office of Federal High-Performance Buildings

Kevin Kampschroer is the Chief Sustainability Officer, and the Director, Office of Federal High-Performance Buildings, in the US General Services Administration. He has created the framework for which GSA responds to the challenges of improving a diverse and aging portfolio of commercial buildings so that they can serve the mission needs of their occupants, support effective work, and deliver solid financial performance. He has devised a challenge for companies to dramatically improve the government’s ability to achieve deep retrofits through Energy Savings Performance contracts—which has doubled the amount of energy conservation from these contracts. His team manages the government’s implementation of a comprehensive improvement in the training and certification of facility managers and personnel across the entire Federal government (Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010). In 2010, the first medical study showing the link between building characteristics on office worker stress and heart function was published; he was a contributing author.  It showed the beneficial results of good lighting, natural light and IEQ. Current work is showing more specific links between the building functions and kinds of office layout and stress, physical activity and health. His goal is to influence and accelerate industry capability and adoption of high-performance principles across all aspects of asset creation, operation, maintenance and disposal. He leads GSA's effort to manage incremental weather and climate-related risks in prudent federal investments for public safety, health and security. He has worked on developing new energy conservation legislation, in expanding the scope of integrated design and related training,

Mr. Kampschroer led the design of improving building performance directed by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and directed the compilation of metrics which are still used to measure building performance.  He led the creation of real estate portfolio management; the establishment of performance measures linked to pay and budget; and was the project manager for the Ronald Reagan Federal Building and Trade Center, then the second largest office building in the United States (344 M2 ). Mr. Kampschroer has worked for GSA for more than 43 years and is a graduate of Yale University.

L. Casey Chosewood

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Director of the Office for Total Worker Health at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

L. Casey Chosewood, M.D., M.P.H., is currently the Director of the Office for Total Worker Health at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this role, he promotes the protection and improvement of the safety, health, and well-being of workers around the world. From 2004 to 2009, he served as the Director of the CDC Office of Health and Safety safeguarding the 15,000 members of the CDC workforce as they faced the new challenges of the modern public health era, including emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism, and other global health challenges. His Office led numerous CDC workforce protection programs, including all occupational health services, laboratory and biosafety programs, environmental and compliance activities, and workplace well-being and prevention initiatives. He has served as the Medical Director of the CDC’s three occupational health clinics. His team has overseen a multifaceted workplace health program providing more than 200,000 safety consults, screenings, and health opportunities annually. He has presented extensively on the following topics: occupational safety and health; biological and laboratory safety; international travel medicine; and workplace safety, health, and well-being. Dr. Chosewood received his medical degree at the Medical College of Georgia and completed his residency in family medicine at the University of Connecticut. He has been an Assistant Professor of Family and Community Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine since 1997. He received an M.P.H. in health policy and management from Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in May 2014. Before coming to the CDC, Dr. Chosewood was the Medical Director for the Southeastern Region of Lucent Technologies.

Andrew Dannenberg

University of Washington in Seattle
Affiliate Professor

Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH, is an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and in the Department of Urban Design and Planning at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he teaches courses on health and built environment and on health impact assessment.  He serves as co-chair of the Design and Health Leadership Group of the American Institute of Architects.  Before coming to Seattle, he served as Team Leader of the Healthy Community Design Initiative in the National Center for Environmental Health, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. For the past 15 years, his research and teaching has focused on examining the health aspects of community design including land use, transportation, urban planning, and other issues related to the built environment. He has a particular interest in the use of a health impact assessment as a tool to inform community planners about the health consequences of their decisions. Previously he served as Director of CDC's Division of Applied Public Health Training, as Preventive Medicine Residency director and as an injury prevention epidemiologist on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health in Baltimore, and as a cardiovascular epidemiologist at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda. He received his MD from Stanford University and his MPH from Johns Hopkins, and completed a family practice residency at the Medical University of South Carolina.  With Howard Frumkin and Richard Jackson, Dr. Dannenberg co-edited the book Making Healthy Places: Designing and Building for Health, Well-being, and Sustainability (Island Press, 2011, http://www.makinghealthyplaces.com). 

Joanna Frank

Center for Active Design (CfAD)
Founding President and CEO

Joanna Frank is the founding President and CEO of the Center for Active Design (CfAD), where she advances design and development practices to foster healthy and engaged communities. The Center for Active Design is the operator for Fitwel, a unique building certification that positively impacts occupant health and productivity through an integrated approach to workplace design and operations. Fitwel’s development was led by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the General Services Administration (GSA). Prior to launching CfAD, Ms. Frank worked for the City of New York during the Bloomberg Administration, where her positions included Director of Active Design and Director of the NYC FRESH program. Before working for the City, Ms. Frank was a Partner at Bright City Development, LLC where she was responsible for the development of mixed-use residential buildings using sustainable design criteria. Ms. Frank is a member of the American Heart Association Workplace Health Steering Committee, as well as the Urban Land Institute's Affordable/Workforce Housing Council.

Esther Sternberg

University of Arizona
Founding Director, Institute on Place and Wellbeing

Internationally recognized pioneer in design and health, Dr. Esther Sternberg is Founding Director of University of Arizona’s Institute on Place and Wellbeing, founding member of the American Institute of Architects Design and Health Leadership Group and AIA Design and Health Research Consortium; has advised the US Acting Surgeon General and Surgeon General’s Office, US General Services Administration, US Department of Defense, US Green Building Council, and the Vatican on the impact of the built environment on health. Previously NIH Senior Scientist and Section Chief, she authored >220 scholarly articles, two popular books including best-selling Healing Spaces: The Science of Place and Wellbeing (Harvard University Press), which helped launch the field, and hosted PBS Television Special Science of Healing. A dynamic speaker, Dr. Sternberg is frequently interviewed by the media and invited to keynote, including Australian Green Cities, TEDx (UTA & Tucson), Vatican’s 27th Pontifical Council for Healthcare Workers, and NIH Health in Buildings Roundtable. In recognition of her work, she has received the highest NIH, HHS, and FDA awards, been recognized by the NLM as one of 300 women who “Changed the Face of Medicine,” received an Honorary Doctorate in Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin, and in 2017-2018 Chaired the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine.

11:50 AM to 01:00 PM
Lunch & Poster Session
Room: 
Lunch at Natcher Cafeteria & Poster Session at Natcher Atrium
Research Posters are widely used in the academic community to summarize information or research concisely and attractively to help publicize it and generate discussion.  Poster sessions provide a unique forum for the HiBR Scholars to explore topics and fuel discussions during the conference through a mixture of brief text mixed with tables, graphs, pictures, and other presentation formats.
 
The sessions are open to the entire conference audience, and are intended to bring forward research, knowledge of best practices and tangible results in the area of health and sustainable buildings. During a short introduction, presenters give a one minute pitch describing their posters. Following the pitches, presenters engage with participants, respond to questions, and provide further details about their work.
 
The 2018 Health in Buildings Roundtable Scholars and Presenters are:
Amy Kim, PhD Ashrant Aryal Casey Lindberg, PhD 
Diana Nicholas  Jennifer Senick, PhD  Lisa Bartlett
Margaret van Bakergem Meng Kong, PhD Moira Gannon Denson 
Nea Maloo  Nicole Alfonsin  Ronald Denson Jr 
Ruikang He  Sarah Skenazy Shuoqi Wang, PhD 
Ulrike Passe Vineet Awasthi William M Worek, PhD
Xinyi Song, PhD  Xuemei Zhu, PhD Young Lee, PhD
     

Speakers

Linda Sorrento

Sorrento Consulting, LLC
Principal Sustainable Practice

A deep concern for how interior environments affect human health and performance has informed every facet of Linda Sorrento’s career as an interior designer, educator and promoter of healthy, safe and livable environments. After a 40+ years career, it is important to Linda that professionals have the knowledge, tools and foresight to make bold, innovative and responsible decisions for building occupants.  
 
Embracing the guiding principles of environmental design as a passion, understanding and strength, Linda was selected as the inaugural Executive Director (Emerita) of the National Academy of Environmental Design (NAED) convening a diverse coalition of academia and practice providing the thought leadership for healthy, safe and flourishing communities. Today, her work is grounded in this belief as subject matter expert for the U.S. GSA Sustainable Facilities Tool, which identifies and prioritizes cost-effective healthy building strategies for improved building performance.  
 
Linda was the Senior Director Education Partnerships at the U.S Green Building Council (USGBC) where she initiated and maintained strategic relationships with leading industry organizations to advance the Council’s mission of market transformation through high-quality green building education. Under her direction, USGBC launched REGREEN® residential remodeling guidelines in partnership with American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) and the Green Jobs and Greenbuild® Scholarship initiatives. Linda joined the USGBC in 2004 as its inaugural Director of LEED for Commercial Interiors. In this role, she shepherded LEED-CI through its journey from pilot launch to adoption. She was a contributor to the USGBC Center for Green Schools “Green Classroom Professional Certificate” for K-12 teachers to create healthy sustainable classrooms.   
 
Prior to USGBC, Linda practiced as a corporate interior designer for 29 years, cultivating a wide-ranging experience with major corporate clients. She is a former assistant professor at George Washington University and Northern Virginia Community College where her teaching and research focused on human behavior, materials and environmental design.  
 
Numerous honors and awards including USGBC LEED Fellow, ASID Fellow, ASID national recipient of the 2013 Nancy Vincent McClelland Merit Award, Marymount University 
Distinguished Alumna and Interior Design Alumna Awards, recognize Linda’s deep commitment to the design community. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Healthy Building Network and The American Institute of Architects’ Materials Knowledge Working Group as past co-chair and current thought-leader. Linda holds a BFA in interior design from Syracuse University and a MA in interior design from Marymount University. 

Patrick (Pat) Phelan

Arizona State University
Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Senior Sustainability Scientist Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs (Engineering)

Patrick ‘Pat’ Phelan is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), and the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs in the ASU Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.  He is also a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the ASU Global Institute of Sustainability.  After receiving his BS from Tulane University, his MS from MIT, and his PhD from UC Berkeley, he was awarded a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.  He began his academic career at the University of Hawaii as an Assistant Professor, and moved to ASU in 1996.  While there he has taken two leaves of absence:  the first at the National Science Foundation where he managed the Thermal Transport Processes Program (2006 – 2008), and the second at the Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office, where he managed the Emerging Technologies Program (2012 – 2016).

Pat’s research focuses on thermal engineering, sustainable energy systems, and energy policy.  While at DOE he funded and co-led the Buildings of the Future (http://futurebuildings.labworks.org/)  initiative with Dr. Nora Wang from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.  He has authored or co-authored more than 120 refereed journal publications.

01:00 PM to 02:20 PM
Lightning Round: “Putting Building Policies into Practice to Improve Health"
Room: 
Auditorium

Scientific evidence supporting healthy practices in the built environment is robust enough that wide spread application can benefit public health. However, effective translation of research into building practice and policy requires active collaboration and buy in from a diverse range of experts and stakeholders focusing on basic research, design, architecture, management, worksite wellness, public health, policy making, and more. This process does not work without guidance and feedback to determine what the problems are, what is needed to resolve them, and how solutions can become standard practice. 

This session will explore the translation of research into health promotion policies withAndrea Swiatocha and Matthew Trowbridge exploring the school environment and beyond, Casey Lindberg and Bryan Steverson discussing commercial offices and beyond, and Shannon Kraus and Stephanie Taylor exploring the healthcare setting.

Speakers

Casey Lindberg

University of Arizona
Postdoctoral Research Associate, Institute on Place and Wellbeing

Casey Lindberg is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Arizona Institute on Place and Wellbeing. His PhD in experimental psychology from Stanford University and his Master of Architecture from the University of Colorado allow for his expertise in studying how the built environment affects human health, wellbeing, and performance. He is particularly interested in design solutions for the dissimilar effects the built environment has on people due to individual differences. 

Shannon Kraus

HKS Architects
Principal & Executive Vice President, Board of Directors

Shannon Kraus, FAIA, Principal & Executive Vice President, Board of Directors, HKS Architects. Focused on innovation around community health and well-being, Shannon is passionate about teaming with clients to shape strategies and projects that leverage architecture and design thinking to positively impact their missions, and the communities they serve.

With over 15 years of planning and design experience, Shannon has been an integral part of the development of health facilities, neighborhoods and communities throughout the United States and abroad on projects of all sizes in scope.  His work has been honored with design awards from both the AIA, and Modern Healthcare, and has been recognized in publications such as World Architecture News, Healthcare Design, and Hospitality Design magazines.

A provocative thought leader, in 2005 he served as National Vice President on the American Institute of Architects Board of Directors where he helped organize and lead the organizations knowledge and research agenda.  In 2007 he launched and founded the HKS design fellowship, focused on bringing together designers across the globe together for the purposes of providing design thinking to a community base need.  Shannon is a board-certified healthcare architect by ACHA.  Currently Shannon is a thought leader with the AIA’s multi-disciplinary Design Health Leadership Group, which is tasked to empower architects to enhance human health through the power of design in all building types.

Responsible for three offices, Shannon is passionate about helping others succeed, and thus is an advocate for empowering people and helping them thrive.  In 2017 his office was named top A/E firm by Washington Business Journal Best Places to work. In recognition of his contributions, he was awarded young architect of the year from the AIA in 2005. In 2008 he was named one of building design and constructions 40 under 40, and in 2009 was honored as one of the Dallas Business Journal’s 40 under 40 honorees. In 2013 he was named Fellow by both the AIA and the ACHA.

Bryan Steverson

U.S. General Service Administration (GSA)
Program Advisor, Office of Federal High-Performance Buildings

Bryan Steverson is a Program Advisor with GSA's Office of Federal High-Performance Buildings where he has led the circadian lighting research program over the past 5 years that has identified several connections between indoor lighting in office buildings and human health benefits and is currently working to translate these findings into guidance, best practices and policies for use in federal buildings. Bryan has over 16 years of experience in high-performance buildings and environmental policy. He has co-authored several articles for the Journal of Sleep Health and the Journal of Lighting Research and Technology on circadian lighting in office buildings. Bryan has also presented GSA’s research findings at several national conferences, webinars, and podcasts such as the US Green Buildings Council podcast entitled Built for Health where he discussed the connections between lighting and health. Bryan resides in Northern Virginia with his wife and three kids. 

Andrea Swiatocha

District of Columbia Public Schools
Manager, Facility Planning and Design

Andrea Swiatocha, AIA, LEED AP is a Manager at DC Public Schools Facility Planning and Design team.  Andrea oversees the design for all DCPS School Modernizations in the District of Columbia that are managed through a collaboration between the Department of General Services and the District of Columbia Public Schools.  Part of her role includes leading the program development, education specifications, community engagement and design approval of the building.  Andrea is an advocate for design excellence in student learning environments.  As a member of the AIA Design and Health Leadership Group (DHLG) and the AIA|DC Design + Wellbeing Committee, Andrea is committed to improving human health through the design of the built environment. Andrea graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Miami University and a Master of Architecture from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Stephanie Taylor

HMS Primary Care InciteHealth
Harvard Medical School InciteHealth Fellow

Dr. Stephanie Taylor received her MD from Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts in 1984. For the next several decades, she practiced clinical medicine and did academic research in cellular growth mechanisms.

During this time, she became increasingly concerned about the patients who were harmed by medical errors and new infections during their in-patient treatment. Determined to gain a better understanding of the impact of the built environment on patient wellbeing, she returned to school and obtained her Master's Degree in Architecture from Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont.

After working for several years in a healthcare design architecture firm, she founded Taylor Healthcare Consulting, Inc., in order to focus on designing, building and maintaining hospitals and other commercial buildings for optimal occupant safety. Dr. Taylor is currently working on projects that overlay design and engineering schematics, the microbiome of the built environment and data on occupant health to identify design and indoor air management that relate to acute and chronic health conditions. Dr. Taylor has designed hospitals globally, from the United States to Papua New Guinea to Vietnam. In addition to her Taylor Healthcare Consulting work, she is a member of the Harvard Medical School Incite Health Fellowship. This program brings together multidisciplinary teams from across the US, trains them in design thinking and entrepreneurship, and gives them the tools and resources to guide the future of primary care.

To communicate her work and understanding about the fascinating convergence of human health, microbiology and architecture, Dr. Taylor writes a monthly column and bi-annual feature articles for Engineered Systems Magazine and healthcare journals. She is an active member of ASHRAE, ASHE and other associations that develop building codes.

Dr. Taylor lives in rural Stowe, Vermont with her husband and eight dogs. One of her favorite pastimes is skydiving, which she finds is great practice for fearless living!

Matthew Trowbridge

University of Virginia School of Medicine
Associate Professor

Matthew Trowbridge is a physician, public health researcher, and associate professor at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine and a nationally recognized expert on the impact of the built environment on health, well-being and equity. Dr. Trowbridge’s academic research focuses on the impact of architecture, urban design, and transportation planning on public health. Dr. Trowbridge is principal investigator for the Green Health Partnership between UVA and the U.S. Green Building Council (http://greenhealthpartnership.org). This multi-year initiative, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, seeks to drive increased consideration of health and well-being outcomes within the real estate industry by applying green building principles and tools of market transformation.

Previously, Dr. Trowbridge has been a senior advisor to the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research, a partnership between multiple federal and private funding agencies, on built environment and childhood obesity prevention research development. He also served three years as a senior advisor on built environment and childhood obesity prevention research at the National Cancer Institute at NIH. Dr. Trowbridge is board certified in both general pediatrics and preventive medicine and obtained his medical and public health training at Emory University.

02:20 PM to 02:30 PM
Break - Transition to Mezzanine
Room: 
Mezzanine
02:30 PM to 03:45 PM
Hosted Porter Neuroscience Research Center (PNRC) Building Tour (Day 1)
Room: 
Mezzanine

More than a decade ago, neuroscience leaders at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) foresaw the need to catalyze collaboration across the many diverse subfields of brain research. Their vision gave rise to the concept of a new type of research facility, one that would unite neuroscience research across the NIH. Every aspect of this 500,000 square foot, state-of-the-art complex speaks to the ingenuity and wisdom of its distinguished namesake — from the interactive labs and shared resource spaces to the innovative features that make it one of the world’s most energy-efficient life science facilities. Read more...

 

 

Join Architect Jeff Welter and former Project Officer on the Project (retired) Frank Kutlak, along with 2018 Health in Buildings Conference attendees, for an inside tour of this inspiring, healthy and high-performing building. Fernando Arias will organize and guide the group with tour logistics and transportation.  

REGISTER FOR TOUR HERE

Speakers

Jeffrey Welter

Perkins+Will
Associate Principal, Practice Leader
Jeffrey Welter is an Associate Principal and practice leader in Perkins+Will’s Washington, DC office. With over 30 years of architectural, project management, and construction experience, Jeff has led large multi-faceted and multi-disciplined teams. He has worked on a variety of project types including higher education, science and technology, federal, corporate, commercial, healthcare, and high-security. He is a key contributor in developing and executing all the components and goals of a project.

Jeff is known for listening to client’s needs while working in collaboration with his partners and project teams to create comprehensive and integrated project delivery. Jeff is familiar with the process and development of local campus projects including the National Institutes of Health, The George Washington University, and George Mason University.
Fernando Arias, Director of Sustainability, Clark Construction Group

Fernando Arias

Clark Construction Group, LLC
Director of Sustainability

Fernando Arias is a former architect and military technician who became passionate about high quality of life early in his career. As Clark Construction Group’s Director of Sustainability, he works with executive leadership to shape Clark’s national sustainability strategy. His passion for green partnerships, plus his many years of experience and expertise in building design and construction, enhances Clark’s sustainability efforts across the country through expanded services, including holistic and advanced approaches to sustainable buildings and infrastructure.

Most recently, Fernando consulted government, non-profit and private sector clients focused on healthy design strategies through outreach on sustainable, healthy community planning via the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) at the National Institutes of Health. He also directed strategic projects and partnerships at the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for multi-million dollar initiatives that drive industry coalitions around age-friendly buildings, and health + wellness engagement.

Prior to joining ASID, Fernando managed strategic relationships at the Clinton Global Initiative, served in both the United States Navy and the Army, practiced architecture for 7 years in New York City and Los Angeles, consulted for Accenture’s Resources Group, and worked for the New York City Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning & Sustainability. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and holds two Masters Degrees from Columbia University in Architecture & Urban Design and in Public Administration focused on Environmental Science and Policy.

02:30 PM to 03:50 PM
Breakout Session (Day 1)
Room: 
Mezzanine

Groups of diverse professionals/subject matter experts Making Connections to explore and cross-walk sustainability and health in buildings from different perspectives in order to promote research/implementation/practice.

Discussion topics will include: Water and Indoor Moisture, Indoor Air Quality, Psychosocial Outcomes and Urban Greenspace, Physical Activity, Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR), Measurement Methods for Human Health, Energy, Health and Sustainable Communities, Imagining the Future.

03:50 PM to 04:00 PM
Break – Transition to Auditorium
04:00 PM to 04:45 PM
Breakout Session Report-out (Day 1)
Room: 
Auditorium
04:45 PM to 05:00 PM
End of Day 1 Remarks + Announcements
Room: 
Auditorium

Speakers

Michelle Coley

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Management Analyst, Division of Environmental Protection

Michelle L. Coley is a highly motivated management analyst and Contracting Officer Representative (COR) for the Division of Environmental Protection (DEP) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

She formerly managed the Federal Environmental Symposium on the campus of the NIH at the Natcher Conference Center from 2002 – 2006 saving the government approximately $45K in conference planning costs.  She is currently managing the Health in Buildings Roundtable Program for the NIH/DEP along with negotiating the development of the very first Health in Buildings Roundtable website for HHS/NIH.  She has been identified as the customer service advocate and analyst for the NIH/DEP Decommissioning Team. 

Michelle is a key member of the NIH/DEP management team which depends on her to develop administrative strategies, processes, procedures and recommendations that allow the leadership team to exercise critical judgements as it relates to the environmental review process, customer service and communication solutions for division staff.  She is responsible for overseeing customer relations and developing outreach strategies to ensure that services are satisfactory and consistent with operational needs. 

Michelle’s keen understanding of group coordination, problem solving and integration of work processes facilitate team success. 

Michelle graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a Master’s degree in Human Resource Management/Organizational Development. 

Fernando Arias, Director of Sustainability, Clark Construction Group

Fernando Arias

Clark Construction Group, LLC
Director of Sustainability

Fernando Arias is a former architect and military technician who became passionate about high quality of life early in his career. As Clark Construction Group’s Director of Sustainability, he works with executive leadership to shape Clark’s national sustainability strategy. His passion for green partnerships, plus his many years of experience and expertise in building design and construction, enhances Clark’s sustainability efforts across the country through expanded services, including holistic and advanced approaches to sustainable buildings and infrastructure.

Most recently, Fernando consulted government, non-profit and private sector clients focused on healthy design strategies through outreach on sustainable, healthy community planning via the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) at the National Institutes of Health. He also directed strategic projects and partnerships at the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for multi-million dollar initiatives that drive industry coalitions around age-friendly buildings, and health + wellness engagement.

Prior to joining ASID, Fernando managed strategic relationships at the Clinton Global Initiative, served in both the United States Navy and the Army, practiced architecture for 7 years in New York City and Los Angeles, consulted for Accenture’s Resources Group, and worked for the New York City Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning & Sustainability. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and holds two Masters Degrees from Columbia University in Architecture & Urban Design and in Public Administration focused on Environmental Science and Policy.

Friday - July 20, 2018
08:00 AM to 08:45 AM
Check-in & Networking
Room: 
Natcher
08:45 AM to 09:00 AM
Opening & Welcome Remarks
Room: 
Auditorium

Speakers

Fernando Arias, Director of Sustainability, Clark Construction Group

Fernando Arias

Clark Construction Group, LLC
Director of Sustainability

Fernando Arias is a former architect and military technician who became passionate about high quality of life early in his career. As Clark Construction Group’s Director of Sustainability, he works with executive leadership to shape Clark’s national sustainability strategy. His passion for green partnerships, plus his many years of experience and expertise in building design and construction, enhances Clark’s sustainability efforts across the country through expanded services, including holistic and advanced approaches to sustainable buildings and infrastructure.

Most recently, Fernando consulted government, non-profit and private sector clients focused on healthy design strategies through outreach on sustainable, healthy community planning via the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) at the National Institutes of Health. He also directed strategic projects and partnerships at the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for multi-million dollar initiatives that drive industry coalitions around age-friendly buildings, and health + wellness engagement.

Prior to joining ASID, Fernando managed strategic relationships at the Clinton Global Initiative, served in both the United States Navy and the Army, practiced architecture for 7 years in New York City and Los Angeles, consulted for Accenture’s Resources Group, and worked for the New York City Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning & Sustainability. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and holds two Masters Degrees from Columbia University in Architecture & Urban Design and in Public Administration focused on Environmental Science and Policy.

09:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Main Plenary: "The Energy and Health Nexus"
Room: 
Auditorium

In 2006, the buildings in the US produced more greenhouse gases than any other single country in the world except for China. At the same time, the average American spends nearly 90% of their life inside buildings, and so the indoor environment, with physical, biological, and chemical hazards, is a dominant source of health-affecting exposures. Solutions to solve one environmental or health problem, such as changes in insulation and ventilation to reduce energy consumption, can create new problems or help solve other health issues. And with increasing penetration of distributed energy generation, storage, and electrification in many markets around the world, the relationship between buildings and energy is more dynamic and time- and place-dependent than ever. These trends create powerful opportunities for health promotion, but also complexity and challenges for long-standing practice.

 Moderator John Balbus will engage international experts Joseph Allen, Bon Ku, and Chris Pyke in a far-reaching conversation about the interactions between energy use, indoor and built environments, and human health, from the macro to the micro scale.

Speakers

John Balbus

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Senior Advisor for Public Health

John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., is the Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, where he directs the NIEHS-WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Sciences.  He serves as HHS principal to the U.S. Global Change Research Program and also co-chairs working groups on Climate Change and Human Health for the US Global Change Research Program and for the National Institutes of Health.  Balbus has served as a lead author on health for the past two US National Climate Assessments and a Review Editor for the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  He is co-author of the HHS guide document “Primary Protection:  Enhancing Health Care Resilience for a Changing Climate.” 

Joseph Allen

Harvard University
Assistant Professor, T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dr. Joseph G. Allen is an assistant professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He began his career conducting forensic health investigations of sick buildings in several hundred buildings across a diverse range of industries, including healthcare, biotechnology, education, commercial office real estate and manufacturing. At Harvard, Dr. Allen directs the Healthy Buildings program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment where he created ‘the 9 Foundations of a Healthy Building’, and he is the faculty advisor to the Harvard Healthier Building Materials Academy. He presents internationally on the topic of Healthy Buildings, and his work has been featured widely in the popular press, including the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, National Geographic, Time, NPR, Newsweek, Washington Post, and Fortune. Dr. Allen’s research is widely published in academic journals and he is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. He earned his Doctor of Science (DSc) and Master of Public Health (MPH) degrees from the Boston University School of Public Health, and a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Biology from Boston College. More information on his research can be found at: www.ForHealth.org.

Bon Ku

Thomas Jefferson University
Assistant Dean for Health and Design

Bon Ku, MD, MPP is the Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. He is a practicing emergency medicine physician and the founder/director of the first design thinking program in a medical school. His innovative program that teaches future physicians to apply human-centered design to healthcare challenges has been highlighted in the The New York Times, New England Journal of Medicine Catalyst, The Huffington Post, Next City and Architectural Digest. Dr. Ku has spoken widely on the intersection of health and design thinking (TEDx, South by Southwest, Mayo Clinic Transform, Stanford Medicine X) and serves on the Design and Health Leadership Group at the American Institute of Architects. In 2016 he received the Health Care Innovators Award from the Philadelphia Business Journal. Dr. Ku holds a master’s degree in Public Policy from Princeton University, MD from Penn State and a bachelor’s degree in Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. You can find Bon on Twitter discussing design, health and technology: @bonku.

Chris Pyke

U.S. Green Building Council
Research Officer

Chris Pyke, Ph.D. is the Research Officer for the U.S. Green Building Council and Green Business Certification, Inc. He leads applied research and innovation partnerships to benefit people and the environment. Dr. Pyke has experience in the private sector, non-profits, and government, including service as the Chief Strategy Officer for Aclima, Inc. the Chief Operating Officer for GRESB, B.V., and a physical scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He is a co-principal investigator for the Green Health Partnership, a 5-year research initiative supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He has served in a number of advisory roles, including representing the United States as a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Dr. Pyke is on the faculties of urban planning programs at Georgetown University and The George Washington University. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of California, Santa Barbara and a B.S. Magna Cum Laude from the College of William and Mary.

10:00 AM to 10:10 AM
Break
10:10 AM to 11:40 AM
Track Discussions: "Community Solutions to Improve Health"
Room: 
Auditorium

The impact of how our communities and buildings are built, designed, and maintained on occupant health and well-being is increasingly recognized by government agencies, energy efficiency programs, planners, healthcare, and public health agencies -- particularly since people spend approximately 90% of their time indoors, according to the U.S. EPA. While progress on creating standards and best practices concerning building-level and community level-interventions to improve public health has taken place, the link between them has not always been clear.

In this session, Jonathan Cohen and Angela Loder will engage experts Rachel GutterKevin Kennedy, Beth McGee, Rachel MacCleery, and Larry Zarker in a discussion concerning current synergies, gaps, and opportunities to better align practices, standards, and guidance.

Range of topics will include: Access to nature, the link between building energy efficiency and health, community planning, green space and biophilia, outdoor noise, outdoor pollution, stress reduction, and access to physical activity.

Speakers

Jonathan Cohen

U.S. Department of Energy
Co-Lead, Health and Home Performance Initiative
Jonathan Cohen, LEED Green Associate, leads the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Better Buildings Residential Network, a national membership network of more than 360 residential energy efficiency programs and partners, and is also co-lead of the Health and Home Performance Initiative. He served as Account Manager for over $175 million in grants that developed energy efficiency markets during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) following the Great Recession.
 
He was previously Director of the Responsible Purchasing Network, a national membership network of businesses, universities, government agencies, and nonprofits that buy green products in volume. He launched the first global standard to verify corporate sustainability reports with the UK-based international organization AccountAbility, ran the NGO program at the United Nations Association of the USA for over seven years, and taught at New York University concerning NGO-Corporate social responsibility partnerships.

Angela Loder

International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)
Vice President, Research
Dr. Angela Loder is a researcher and strategic planner whose work focuses on the relationship between occupant health and well-being, buildings, and urban nature. In particular, Dr. Loder looks at how healthy buildings can be integrated with ecological city and planning objectives; how building design and access to nature impacts stress, concentration, and creativity; and what kind of interdisciplinary collaboration is needed to move health in buildings forward. Her doctoral research looked at the impact that visual and physical access to a green roof in Chicago and Toronto had on office workers’ concentration, stress, and creativity.  Dr. Loder’s research is the first large-scale multi-method study on the health impacts of access to green roofs in urban areas. Dr. Loder has been a core member of the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) with the NIH since 2009.  She is a board member of the Institute for the Built Environment, adjunct faculty at Denver University, and part of the first cohort of WELL Faculty and a WELL AP.

Dominic Ruiz

International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)
Market Development Associate

Dominic Ruiz is a Market Development Associate at the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) whose mission is to improve health and performance through the design and operation of buildings, workplaces, and communities. Using the WELL Building Standard as the vehicle, Dominic has been leading many efforts with real estate industry leaders, government agencies, advocacy groups, and employers around the world. 

Dominic's holds a master's degree in Regional and Community Planning and has a cross-disciplinary background encompassing urban planning, architecture, real estate, public health, and environmental law.

Kevin Kennedy

Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City
Director, Environmental Health Program

Mr. Kevin Kennedy is the Director of the Environmental Health Program at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City. The program provides patient families, childcares, and schools with resources to assist them in identifying and reducing indoor environmental exposures that may result in health problems for children. They perform research on indoor environmental health issues focusing on home interventions, exposure assessment, and more recently on geospatial analysis of health disparities and social determinants of health. Mr. Kennedy has been involved in environmental health science, safe and healthy housing advocacy, and industrial hygiene chemistry consulting for over 25 years. He teaches courses in environmental health assessment and investigations, environmental measurement and sampling, building science, and healthy homes. He received his Master’s Degree in Public Health from the University of Kansas Medical School and serves as adjunct faculty.

Rachel MacCleery

Urban Land Institute
Senior Vice President, Content

Rachel MacCleery is senior vice president at the Urban Land Institute, where she leads the organization’s Building Healthy Places Initiative and other programs. Under Building Healthy Places, Ms. MacCleery is spearheading the organization’s efforts to leverage the power of ULI’s global networks to shape projects and places in ways that improve the health of people and communities. Recent projects have focused on reimagining urban corridors, emphasizing health in housing projects, promoting active transportation investments, and other intersections between health and wellness and development practice.

Rachel has extensive knowledge of land use, environment and sustainability, social equity, and infrastructure policy and practice issues. Prior to working for ULI, Rachel was a consultant for Asian Development Bank infrastructure projects in northeast China for AECOM International Development. She also worked as a community and transportation planner for the city of Washington, DC, where she led efforts to revitalize transportation infrastructure along H Street NE and Barracks Row SE, among other projects.

Rachel has a Masters Degree in Public Administration and Urban and Regional Planning from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She speaks Mandarin Chinese and lives in Washington DC.

Beth McGee

University of Florida
PhD candidate

Beth McGee is a designer, researcher and educator. During her PhD at the University of Florida she has been concentrating on developing her innovative Biophilic Design Matrix which was developed to facilitate interior nature integration for optimal wellness for both people and the planet. She is a LEED AP and is licensed as an interior designer in Florida. She has been published in Health Environments Research & Design Journal and the Journal of Interior Design. She has also presented at multiple conferences regarding her interest in integrating biophilia with sustainable and restorative design.

Larry Zarker

Building Performance Institute
CEO

Larry Zarker is CEO of the Building Performance Institute, the nation's home performance credentialing and standards setting organization. As CEO since 2006, Larry oversees BPI's network of over 22,000 certified professionals and BPI GoldStar contractors. Under his direction BPI became an ANSI accredited standards development organization and certifying body. Prior to BPI, he served as VP of Marketing with the National Association of Home Builders Research Center, where he worked for 20 years.

11:40 AM to 01:00 PM
Lunch & Poster Session
Room: 
Lunch at Natcher Cafeteria & Poster Session at Natcher Atrium
Research Posters are widely used in the academic community to summarize information or research concisely and attractively to help publicize it and generate discussion.  Poster sessions provide a unique forum for the HiBR Scholars to explore topics and fuel discussions during the conference through a mixture of brief text mixed with tables, graphs, pictures, and other presentation formats.
 
The sessions are open to the entire conference audience, and are intended to bring forward research, knowledge of best practices and tangible results in the area of health and sustainable buildings. During a short introduction, presenters give a one minute pitch describing their posters. Following the pitches, presenters engage with participants, respond to questions, and provide further details about their work.
 
The 2018 Health in Buildings Roundtable Scholars and Presenters are:
Amy Kim, PhD Ashrant Aryal Casey Lindberg, PhD 
Diana Nicholas  Jennifer Senick, PhD  Lisa Bartlett
Margaret van Bakergem Meng Kong, PhD Moira Gannon Denson 
Nea Maloo  Nicole Alfonsin  Ronald Denson Jr 
Ruikang He  Sarah Skenazy Shuoqi Wang, PhD 
Ulrike Passe Vineet Awasthi William M Worek, PhD
Xinyi Song, PhD  Xuemei Zhu, PhD Young Lee, PhD
     

Speakers

Linda Sorrento

Sorrento Consulting, LLC
Principal Sustainable Practice

A deep concern for how interior environments affect human health and performance has informed every facet of Linda Sorrento’s career as an interior designer, educator and promoter of healthy, safe and livable environments. After a 40+ years career, it is important to Linda that professionals have the knowledge, tools and foresight to make bold, innovative and responsible decisions for building occupants.  
 
Embracing the guiding principles of environmental design as a passion, understanding and strength, Linda was selected as the inaugural Executive Director (Emerita) of the National Academy of Environmental Design (NAED) convening a diverse coalition of academia and practice providing the thought leadership for healthy, safe and flourishing communities. Today, her work is grounded in this belief as subject matter expert for the U.S. GSA Sustainable Facilities Tool, which identifies and prioritizes cost-effective healthy building strategies for improved building performance.  
 
Linda was the Senior Director Education Partnerships at the U.S Green Building Council (USGBC) where she initiated and maintained strategic relationships with leading industry organizations to advance the Council’s mission of market transformation through high-quality green building education. Under her direction, USGBC launched REGREEN® residential remodeling guidelines in partnership with American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) and the Green Jobs and Greenbuild® Scholarship initiatives. Linda joined the USGBC in 2004 as its inaugural Director of LEED for Commercial Interiors. In this role, she shepherded LEED-CI through its journey from pilot launch to adoption. She was a contributor to the USGBC Center for Green Schools “Green Classroom Professional Certificate” for K-12 teachers to create healthy sustainable classrooms.   
 
Prior to USGBC, Linda practiced as a corporate interior designer for 29 years, cultivating a wide-ranging experience with major corporate clients. She is a former assistant professor at George Washington University and Northern Virginia Community College where her teaching and research focused on human behavior, materials and environmental design.  
 
Numerous honors and awards including USGBC LEED Fellow, ASID Fellow, ASID national recipient of the 2013 Nancy Vincent McClelland Merit Award, Marymount University 
Distinguished Alumna and Interior Design Alumna Awards, recognize Linda’s deep commitment to the design community. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Healthy Building Network and The American Institute of Architects’ Materials Knowledge Working Group as past co-chair and current thought-leader. Linda holds a BFA in interior design from Syracuse University and a MA in interior design from Marymount University. 

Patrick (Pat) Phelan

Arizona State University
Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Senior Sustainability Scientist Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs (Engineering)

Patrick ‘Pat’ Phelan is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), and the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs in the ASU Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.  He is also a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the ASU Global Institute of Sustainability.  After receiving his BS from Tulane University, his MS from MIT, and his PhD from UC Berkeley, he was awarded a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.  He began his academic career at the University of Hawaii as an Assistant Professor, and moved to ASU in 1996.  While there he has taken two leaves of absence:  the first at the National Science Foundation where he managed the Thermal Transport Processes Program (2006 – 2008), and the second at the Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office, where he managed the Emerging Technologies Program (2012 – 2016).

Pat’s research focuses on thermal engineering, sustainable energy systems, and energy policy.  While at DOE he funded and co-led the Buildings of the Future (http://futurebuildings.labworks.org/)  initiative with Dr. Nora Wang from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.  He has authored or co-authored more than 120 refereed journal publications.

01:00 PM to 02:20 PM
Track Discussions: "Emerging Technologies to Track and Improve Health"
Room: 
Auditorium

In this session, Ming Hu and Cece Doucette will facilitate a conversation with William Braham, Joon-Ho Choi, Leidy Klotz, Donald Milton, Frank Clegg, Martin Pall, Peter Sullivan, Devra Davis and/or Theodora Scarato to explore technological advances in buildings. They will discuss associated biological, health, environmental and social impacts, and lead audience participants through safe technology requirements for healthy buildings and public policy.

Speakers

Bill Braham

University of Pennsylvania
Professor of Architecture

William W. Braham, PhD, FAIA is a Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, where he previously served as Chair, and is currently Director of the Master of Environmental Building Design and of the Center for Environmental Building + Design. He has worked on energy and architecture for over 30 years as a designer, consultant, researcher, and author of numerous articles and books.

He recently published Architecture and Systems Ecology: Thermodynamic Principles for Environmental Building Design, in three parts (2015). He also co-edited Energy Accounts: Architectural Representations of Energy, Climate, and the Future (2016), Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style (2013), and Rethinking Technology: A Reader in Architectural Theory (2007). He is currently working on a project called, The City Always Writes in the Plural: Narratives of Urban Self-Organization.

Donald Milton

University of Maryland
Professor, Environmental & Occupational Health | Medicine, School of Public Health

Dr. Donald Milton earned an MD from Johns Hopkins, and an MsOH and a DrPH (Environmental Health) from Harvard. He is currently Professor of Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine. He is board certified in Internal and Occupational and Environmental Medicine and has 20 years of experience in environmental and occupational medicine referral practice. He served on the editorial boards of Applied Environmental Microbiology, Indoor Air, and BMC Public Health, and on the NIOSH NORA Indoor Environment Team and chaired the ACGIH Bioaerosols Committee. His research on indoor exposures associated with asthma, allergy, and infection transmission are highly cited. He holds two patents for exhaled breath and bioaerosol samplers. He is current PI of “Contagious Phenotypes of Acute Respiratory Infection: Identification, Characterization, and Biomarkers” funded by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. 

Joon-Ho Choi

School of Architecture at the University of Southern California
Assistant Professor of Building Science

Dr. Choi, Joon-Ho is an Assistant Professor of Building Science, in the School of Architecture at the University of Southern California. Prior to taking the position, he worked as an assistant professor in the Dept. of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Building Performance and Diagnostics at Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Choi's primary research interests are in the areas of advanced controls for high performance buildings, bio-sensing controls in the built environment, smart building enclosure, passive building strategies, human-centered building environmental control, building systems integration, environmental sustainability, and comprehensive POE (post-occupancy evaluation), indoor environmental quality, and human health, and work productivity. As an interdisciplinary researcher, he has participated in multiple research projects sponsored by governmental agencies, industry partners and research grant programs including General Services Administration (GSA), Boston Society of Architects/AIA, Green Building Alliance (GBA), ALCOA, SIEMENS, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and UNEP. His research outcomes have been published on prestigious journals including “Building and Environment”, and “Energy and Buildings”. He is currently a technical committee member of American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), and is an active member of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality (ISIAQ), American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE), and Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association (KSEA).

Frank Clegg

Canadians For Safe Technology
CEO
Frank Clegg is the Former President of Microsoft Canada, and CEO of Canadians for Safe Technology. Clegg has played a leadership role in the country’s technology sector and in the broader Canadian community for many years. 
 
He was longtime President of Microsoft Canada and is now CEO of Canadians For Safe Technology, a not-for-profit coalition whose mission is to 1) educate and inform Canadians and policy makers about the dangers of the exposures to unsafe levels of radiation from technology; and 2) to work with all levels of government to create healthier communities for children and families.

Cece Doucette

Wireless Education
Communications Director

A technical and professional writer by trade, Cecelia (Cece) Doucette discovered wireless technology brings biological risks and has shifted her career to study the issue, educate the public and affect policy change.

Cece ran many campaigns to bring technology into her local schools, much of it wireless. When she discovered it was hazardous she began the difficult conversation which lead Ashland Public Schools in Massachusetts to become the first in the nation to implement Best Practices for Mobile Devices. Next, she worked to introduce legislation to examine the non-industry funded international science and protect public health. She also collaborated with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to develop public health fact sheets. See her research repository for details, Understanding EMFs: https://sites.google.com/site/understandingemfs/ma-emf-bills.

Cece has helped her local library become the first in the nation to host a documentary film and discussion series on Electromagnetic Radiation and Health, and received a grant to place an Acoustimeter on loan so residents can measure and remediate their radiation exposures.

Cece is also a founder and Communications Director with the international non-profit charity Wireless Education, which has distilled the independent scientific literature and medical advisories into affordable 40-minute on-line courses for Schools & Families and Corporate Safety Induction. See wirelesseducation.org.

She publishes wireless safety information on social media, writes articles for local outlets and has been featured on FOX News, PBS, O’Dwyer’s, EMF Warriors and in the films Generation Zapped and Wi-Fi Refugees.

Cece is called upon to present to school administrators, planning and health boards, building commissioners, parent groups and health professionals, and looks forward to working with the HIBR team. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies and a Master’s in Technical and Professional Writing from Northeastern University.

Ming Hu

University of Maryland
Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

Ming Hu is an Assistant Professor at School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, University of Maryland, College Park. She teaches technology courses focus on the integration of architectural design with structural, materials and enclosure systems.

Her research focuses on the intersections of building systems and green technologies with an emphasis on integrated net zero design, multi-performance systems, building longevity and design decision making. Her research methodologies include a variety environmental simulation techniques such as life cycle assessment, computation fluid dynamic modeling, energy modeling, as well as parametric façade design and 3D prototyping. Her students describe her as having the right balance between theory, concept, and methodology, with extensive practical experience. 

She is an architectural practitioner, educator and researcher with vast experience in high-performance building design, Life Cycle assessment, building performance measurement and benchmarking. She has more than fourteen years’ experience working on international high-profile projects with HOK at Washington D.C office.

She has conducted funded research sponsored by University Transportation Research center, Oak Hill Fund, etc. She has authored over 25 peer-reviewed papers and proceeding papers and over 40 technical reports. She is member of USGBC Pilot Credit Committee member, as well as a member of ASHRAE, Society of Building Science Educators (SBSE).

Leidy Klotz

University of Virginia
Civil Engineering & Arch Professor

Leidy Klotz is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, jointly appointed in Engineering and in Architecture. His scholarship merging design and behavioral science has been consistently funded, including through an NSF CAREER award and through one of the first awards through NSF’s interdisciplinary INSPIRE program. Eight graduates from Leidy’s research team have secured faculty positions, six of whom are from underrepresented groups in engineering. Before entering academia, Leidy worked managing the design and construction of building projects in New Jersey.

Martin Pall

Washington State University (WSU)
Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Basic Medical Sciences

Martin L. Pall is Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Basic Medical Sciences, Washington State University (WSU).  He received his BA in Physics, with honors, FBK, JHU.  He earned his PhD in Biochem/Genet from Caltech.  He was on the faculty of WSU for many years before “retiring,” in 2008.  Since then he has published a 50-page review on multiple chemical sensitivity and 8 papers on low intensity microwave frequency electromagnetic field (MWV-EMF) effects, including on the main mechanism by which these effects are produced.

The main mechanism of action of MWV-EMFs and also lower frequency EMFs is through activation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) acting through the voltage sensor of the VGCCs which is extraordinarily sensitive to the electrical forces of the EMFs.   

Pall has focused most on 10 different effects of MWV-EMFs: Neurological/neuropsychiatric effects; lowered fertility; oxidative stress; 3 types of cellular DNA damage; apoptosis (cell death); excessive intracellular calcium; endocrine effects; cancer; cardiac effects on the electrical control of the heart; very early onset Alzheimer’s and other dementias: Bold face = 11 to 35 reviews; Underline = cumulative effects; italics = becomes apparently irreversible; italics, changed font italic = partially cumulative, partially or completely irreversible. Each of these 10 effects can be produced through the downstream effects of VGCC activation. 

Theodora Scarato

Environmental Health Trust (EHT)
Executive Director

Theodora Scarato is Executive Director of Environmental Health Trust (EHT). As a policy analyst Scarato maintains the comprehensive EHT database on international policy that documents the 20+ nations that have protective policies in place to reduce public exposure to cell phone and wireless radiation.

Locally in Maryland, Scarato has long worked on children’s environmental health issues in the schools and was instrumental in the Prince George’s County School System move to address lead contamination in the schools drinking water. She raised the wireless and health issue to the the Maryland State Advisory Council on Children's Environmental Health Protection which moved to issue first ever state advisory recommendations to the Department of Education to reduce radiofrequency exposures in the school setting.

Scarato also coordinates scientific programs with scientists and research institutions internationally on the issue of cellphones and health such as the 2017 Conferences at Jackson Hole Wyoming and at the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies.

Peter Sullivan

Clear Light Ventures, Inc.
Founder and CEO

Peter Sullivan is the founder and CEO of Clear Light Ventures, Inc., as well as an environmental health funder who focuses on toxins and wireless safety. He serves on the board of directors of Pure Earth (pollution.org), and on the advisory board for the International Institute for Building-Biology & Ecology. He has spent the last 15 years successfully recovering his two sons from autism and sensory issues. 

02:20 PM to 02:30 PM
Break - Transition to Mezzanine
02:30 PM to 03:50 PM
Hosted Porter Neuroscience Research Center (PNRC) Building Tour (Day 2)
Room: 
Mezzanine

More than a decade ago, neuroscience leaders at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) foresaw the need to catalyze collaboration across the many diverse subfields of brain research. Their vision gave rise to the concept of a new type of research facility, one that would unite neuroscience research across the NIH. Every aspect of this 500,000 square foot, state-of-the-art complex speaks to the ingenuity and wisdom of its distinguished namesake — from the interactive labs and shared resource spaces to the innovative features that make it one of the world’s most energy-efficient life science facilities. Read more...

 

 

Join Architect Jeff Welter and former Project Officer on the Project (retired) Frank Kutlak, along with 2018 Health in Buildings Conference attendees, for an inside tour of this inspiring, healthy and high-performing building. Fernando Arias will organize and guide the group with tour logistics and transportation.

REGISTER FOR TOUR HERE

Speakers

Jeffrey Welter

Perkins+Will
Associate Principal, Practice Leader
Jeffrey Welter is an Associate Principal and practice leader in Perkins+Will’s Washington, DC office. With over 30 years of architectural, project management, and construction experience, Jeff has led large multi-faceted and multi-disciplined teams. He has worked on a variety of project types including higher education, science and technology, federal, corporate, commercial, healthcare, and high-security. He is a key contributor in developing and executing all the components and goals of a project.

Jeff is known for listening to client’s needs while working in collaboration with his partners and project teams to create comprehensive and integrated project delivery. Jeff is familiar with the process and development of local campus projects including the National Institutes of Health, The George Washington University, and George Mason University.
Fernando Arias, Director of Sustainability, Clark Construction Group

Fernando Arias

Clark Construction Group, LLC
Director of Sustainability

Fernando Arias is a former architect and military technician who became passionate about high quality of life early in his career. As Clark Construction Group’s Director of Sustainability, he works with executive leadership to shape Clark’s national sustainability strategy. His passion for green partnerships, plus his many years of experience and expertise in building design and construction, enhances Clark’s sustainability efforts across the country through expanded services, including holistic and advanced approaches to sustainable buildings and infrastructure.

Most recently, Fernando consulted government, non-profit and private sector clients focused on healthy design strategies through outreach on sustainable, healthy community planning via the Health in Buildings Roundtable (HiBR) at the National Institutes of Health. He also directed strategic projects and partnerships at the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for multi-million dollar initiatives that drive industry coalitions around age-friendly buildings, and health + wellness engagement.

Prior to joining ASID, Fernando managed strategic relationships at the Clinton Global Initiative, served in both the United States Navy and the Army, practiced architecture for 7 years in New York City and Los Angeles, consulted for Accenture’s Resources Group, and worked for the New York City Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning & Sustainability. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and holds two Masters Degrees from Columbia University in Architecture & Urban Design and in Public Administration focused on Environmental Science and Policy.

02:30 PM to 03:50 PM
Breakout Session (Day 2)
Room: 
Mezzanine

Groups of diverse professionals/subject matter experts Making Connections to explore and cross-walk sustainability and health in buildings from different perspectives in order to promote research/implementation/practice.

Discussion topics will include: Water and Indoor Moisture, Indoor Air Quality, Psychosocial Outcomes and Urban Greenspace, Physical Activity, Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR), Measurement Methods for Human Health, Energy, Health and Sustainable Communities, Imagining the Future.

03:50 PM to 04:00 PM
Break - Transition to Auditorium
04:00 PM to 04:45 PM
Breakout Sessions Report-out (Day 2)
Room: 
Auditorium

Under construction (03.18)

04:45 PM to 05:00 PM
Conference Closing Remarks + Announcements
Room: 
Auditorium

Speakers

Michelle Coley

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Management Analyst, Division of Environmental Protection

Michelle L. Coley is a highly motivated management analyst and Contracting Officer Representative (COR) for the Division of Environmental Protection (DEP) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

She formerly managed the Federal Environmental Symposium on the campus of the NIH at the Natcher Conference Center from 2002 – 2006 saving the government approximately $45K in conference planning costs.  She is currently managing the Health in Buildings Roundtable Program for the NIH/DEP along with negotiating the development of the very first Health in Buildings Roundtable website for HHS/NIH.  She has been identified as the customer service advocate and analyst for the NIH/DEP Decommissioning Team. 

Michelle is a key member of the NIH/DEP management team which depends on her to develop administrative strategies, processes, procedures and recommendations that allow the leadership team to exercise critical judgements as it relates to the environmental review process, customer service and communication solutions for division staff.  She is responsible for overseeing customer relations and developing outreach strategies to ensure that services are satisfactory and consistent with operational needs. 

Michelle’s keen understanding of group coordination, problem solving and integration of work processes facilitate team success. 

Michelle graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a Master’s degree in Human Resource Management/Organizational Development.